It makes one quiver

A quiet moment in the backcountry.

A quiet moment in the backcountry


As spring arrives here a bit early I thought it would be a good time to revisit the skis I’ve been on over the last year or two. Last season, I chimed in on what variety of skis I was utilizing for various human powered backcountry adventures. Again, I have found myself with a similar quiver and corresponding outlook on such setups. Not much has changed but I’ve been on a bunch of skis in the interim – some good, some bad, and some indifferent. Luckily, I have a ski partner who has the same BSL as me, which has helped facilitate the amount of ski testing I’ve had access to over the last few years.

Said ski partner, Adam, high in the Crazy Mountains

Said ski partner, Adam, high in the Crazy Mountains

For a quick background, I am 5’10”, 145lbs. I love big mountains and fast lines but more often than not, do my fair share of wiggle turns. Bridger Bowl is my hometown ski area although I’m usually there in the pre/post-season. My average day is somewhere between 3000′ and 7000′ vert in the 5-15 mile range here in Montana and Wyoming. Going into spring, this season has me at over 50 days of backcountry skiing with hundreds of miles and hundreds of thousands vertical feet. October-July is usually our season with everything from knee+ deep cold smoke to spring corn and all points between. Most of the winter here often entails some form of deep powder skiing.

Snorkeling. JaPOW?! Nope, just some mid-winter MT blower

Snorkeling. JaPOW?! Nope, just some mid-winter MT blower

An equally important piece of the pie, I ski on a couple different boots and bindings. Some of this is dictated by cost and/or availability but it all is part of a system. I use a mix of bindings – all tech (Dynafit) style. Currently I have a some Plum race bindings, Dynafit Speed Superlights, and Speed Radical toes/Speed Turn heels. For boots, this is my second season on the TLT6 Performance. I can’t say enough good about this boot, with a few minor nitpicks (cuff pivot!) that have already been hashed out on WildSnow/TGR. I’ve also just taken the plunge, and snagged some Aliens. No, not the 1.0, but a damn light and sneaker-like ski shoe all the same. My horizons just may have been expanded yet again.

Aliens, GTR, and sastrugi. Going up

Aliens, GTR, and sastrugi. Going up

On to the ski quiver. I’ll start with the skinny and work my way to the fat. I’ll also include skis I’ve skied over this last year but don’t currently own.
(My current quiver of three will each have an * to denote).

Myself on a Montana classic, close to home. Photo courtesy Jon Cummins

Myself on a Montana classic, close to home. Photo courtesy Jon Cummins

SPECS:

[Sidecut (mm), Mfg spec weight per ski (g), Turn radius (m), My verified weight per ski (g)]

Dynafit Cho Oyu 174 (125-88-111, 1190g, 16-12-15, 1208g)
Sportiva GTR 168* (114-82-104, 1250g, 22, 1253g)
Voile Vector 180 (121-96-110, 1560g, 23, 1550g)
Voile V6 173* (121-98-107, 1499g, 18, 1503g)
Voile V6 183 (124-100-109, 1675g, 19, 1698g)
Dynafit Huascaran 177* (134-112-123, 1780g, 35-19-30, 1794g)

Adam styling a surfy exit from another MT classic

Adam styling a surfy exit from another MT classic

As I had considered about a year ago, I broke down and purchased the much hyped Dynafit Cho Oyu in a 174cm length late last season (13/14). Skied it a bunch of times and couldn’t wait to sell em. Mounted center with Speed Superlights and rear adjustment plates. The Cho was a squirrely ride, even in near perfect boot top pow. My aforementioned ski partner, Adam, also skied them in the same great conditions on the same slopes/aspects and came to the same conclusion as I. Despite this I continued to try to make them work in various terrain but was time and time again left unimpressed. That’s the game though – can’t really know until you try. I’m sure the Cho works for some, but not for me. I believe that Coast Steep Skier has used them in dicier conditions than I’ll ever ski, so please take my dislike for this ski with a grain of salt.

Adam skiing the Cho's smaller more stable sibling - Seven Summits 2.0 on ice

Adam skiing the Cho’s smaller more stable sibling – Seven Summits 2.0 on ice

So moving on to what works for me: Sportiva’s GTR (168)

La Sportiva GTR 168. On the up

La Sportiva GTR 168. On the up


Bomber. My go-to “edged alpinism” ski. As a nod to the GTR, both myself and Adam have owned/extensively skied the GTR and give it high praise. Steady, stable and fairly traditional. A bit of tip rocker and a straight tail. Not super light, but not porky either. And damn dear shreddable in most terrain. Also, now discontinued if I’ve done my math correct. I guess I’m a bit late for the boat but am nonetheless stoked on this inaugural ski from Sportiva. A keeper.

Other thoughts on the GTR:
skimolife
Cold Thistle

The best of show/workhorse: Voile Vector (180)

Voile Vector 180. Handheld with real camera on the fly

Voile Vector 180. Handheld with real camera on the fly

Lots of previous internet thoughts on this rad little number. Get it, ride it, shred it. Smile. And repeat. Thank you Voile.
I skied two pairs over the course of three years and have not a bad word against the Vector. A great balance between weight, durability, and ski-ability. In all reasonable terrain. From steep lines to spring corn, this handles everything but the very deepest. I believe it demands more from the skier than the V6 but the results can be quite pleasant. It’s definitely not as playful as the V6 but it still has enough rocker to make it surf when need be. My trusty workhorse.

Voile V6 (173 and 183)

Voile V6 173. Late season skinning with bear spray

Voile V6 173. Late season skinning with bear spray


I snagged a couple of these in different lengths and ended up settling on the shorter 173 as my quiver of one length. The 183 was a better length for my style of skiing but I made a choice and learned my lesson. The 173 has been seeing use this end of winter and into spring as what I thought would be a wider and lighter replacement to the 180 Vector. I was also wrong in this assumption.
Voile V6 up in the Tobacco Roots

Voile V6 up in the Tobacco Roots


Both the Vector and the V6 have characteristics that make them unique skis in the quiver. I should’ve known but had to ski it to believe it. The larger turn radius and narrower profile of the Vector I find to be better suited for ski mountaineering and opening up the throttle, while the playfully shorter radius and wider platform of the V6 makes it better suited for treed powder and trickier, variable snow. Although I’ve skied some steeper technical lines with the V6, I would likely choose the Vector for said terrain given another round.

Last but not least, the venerable land shark: Dynafit Huascaran (177)

Dynafit 177 Huascaran. Looking down at two very memorable solo lines. The next photo gives some perspective

Dynafit 177 Huascaran. Looking down at two very memorable solo lines. The next photo gives some perspective


If there is a quantity of snow, this beast of a lightweight plank keeps me grinning all day long. Two years of use and I’m sold. They turn big, turn small, shuck and jive when needed, and smear like a modern 5-point ski is supposed to. I have to really try to break their speed limit in deep snow – which is quite pleasant for such a relatively short ski. Too bad that Dynafit is doing away with this offering and replacing it with a more “freeride” (read: HEAVY) oriented ski. Oh well, at least these exist and should now be on steep discount online. Get em while you can!

First of two deep btb north face lines. Huascaran and my signature

First of two deep btb north face lines. Huascaran and my signature

In a nutshell, ski it and find out. After, of course, sufficiently exhausting your online resources for pre-game honing. Then, go spend some of that hard-earned loot and forget that it ever existed! Human powered bc skiing is far more valuable than any monetary figure (obviously) and I’m pretty enamored with the whole process (again, obviously). Despite a quirky snow season here, this ski year has brought me more skiing and more summits/lines than I could have imagined. I hope that yours was just as enjoyable and that spring brings what you are looking for!

Summit bunny dance!

Summit bunny dance!

Adam one fine winter's day

Adam one fine winter’s day

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