Posts in Category: Trail Running

Ridges and loops – Fall in the Spanish Peaks

Julia with Gallatin Peak behind, left

Julia with Gallatin Peak behind, left

Ahhh… a full-length Montana fall. We’ve had quite the autumn this year so Julia and I have been trying to squeeze in as much outside fun as possible during this impeccable weather window. While we have accomplished a lot of “done-in-a-day” recreation, backpacking has fallen off a bit this year due to a few large life events. Thankfully, this long fall season has allowed for us to play a little catch-up with the outdoors. Two free coinciding days recently yielded a most amazing, 20+ mile loop that is not too far from our back door. And with what has amounted to a quintessential Montana Indian summer, it has been hard not to get out to soak it in.

Morning gold along Thompson Lake

Morning gold along Thompson Lake

Julia soaking it up on Indian Ridge with the expansive Gallatin Valley behind

Julia soaking it up on Indian Ridge with the expansive Gallatin Valley behind

Ridgelines are high on the list of fun, as well as loop/lollipop hikes that allow one to traverse different ground nearly the entire trip. Time is sometimes of the essence, and bang for buck has become an increasing theme in our (and maybe your?) ever-evolving backcountry strategy. This particular loop held just what we were looking for – distance not too far or short, miles of ridgeline travel above and at timberline, high and wide alpine vistas, peaks to incorporate just off trail, a logical campsite midway at an alpine lake, and enough up/down to keep us working for it. Everything you need and nothing you don’t.

Summit chickens

Summit chickens

The aptly named, Summit Lake (Photo: Julia)

The aptly named, Summit Lake (Photo: Julia)

The loop begins and ends at S Fork Spanish Creek TH (N end of Madison range) and can be easily figured out from there with a topo, as it is the only true non-redundant loop. It is a great overnight trip, or would also be a great longer run for those so inclined. Overall length is in the low 20’s for mileage and ~5000′ for vert. Clockwise or counter is the only major remaining question. My vote is for a counter clockwise run, based on water availability and terrain selection. It could feasibly be done with just a handheld w/ inline filter if ran in this direction. It could almost be done without a filter, except for one important, and semi-suspect water source. As for backpacking it, we put in the longer mileage day and Indian Ridge first, and thought that this may be the preferred method to camp. But either direction would still be most pleasing.

Miles of this (Photo: J)

Miles of this (Photo: J)

Westward from Beacon Pt.

Westward from Beacon Pt.

Trailside company

Trailside company

Gear Highlights/Lowlights:

A cold, calm night on a bench sitting above the lake yielded, (go figure, yet again) significant condensation inside of our single walled/hybrid Big Sky International Mirage 2P shelter. You’d think we have had enough time over the three-plus years of use to just get rid of it, but no, we press on because of weight/space balance and the hopes for optimal conditions. We do have a double-walled Hilleberg for more serious weather but it is overkill for a lot of summer use here in the Montana Rockies. So along comes the Mirage 2P and then we end up cursing it about half of the time. And loving it the other half.

Big Sky Mirage 2P just waiting to accumulate condensation

Big Sky Mirage 2P just waiting to accumulate condensation

So, it may be time to rethink the 2P summer shelter situation come next year. We’ll have to leave that one for when the time comes though, so until next time folks. Winter is currently knocking on the door.

Blustery Bridger ridge run, the end of October

Blustery Bridger ridge run, the end of October

The Rut 50K 2014 race report

The ridge climb up to Lone Peak. (photo: Julia)

The ridge climb up to Lone Peak. (photo: Julia)

It’s now been two weeks since I participated in The Rut 50K and I am still very much enthusiastic about the whole event. If you are into mountain ultra running then this race comes highly suggested. All three races (VK, 12K, 50K) drew a total of over 1000 runners from all over the globe. Even a mountain running showdown of sorts between Kilian Jornet and Sage Canaday for the Ultra Skymarathon Series title took place with Kilian eventually taking the win with a stout 5:09:31 in the 50K. A gnarly time on a significantly challenging course. A bunch of elite international athletes competed and added to the already deep field of local and regional talent. The overall feel was one of a big, and well-organized event.

Myself (in green) and the eventual winner, Kilian Jornet (in red) staying warm at the 50K start. (photo: J)

Myself (in green) and the eventual winner, Kilian Jornet (in red) staying warm at the 50K start. (photo: J)

A three-piece band? At ~19 miles into the race and over 9000 ft high on the ridge to Lone Peak summit? Only at The Rut 50K!

A three-piece band? At ~19 miles into the race and over 9000 ft high on the ridge to Lone Peak summit? Only at The Rut 50K!

The race went something like this:

And they're off! (photo: J)

And they’re off! (photo: J)

6am start (and a brisk 33°F) to the sound of an elk bugle. Cowbells, camera flashes, headlamps, and excitement in the air. Up 1500′ over the first two miles to get the blood flowing. Consistently up & then a fast next 5.5 miles down. Good stuff. I barely touched the 7.5 mile Madison Village aid except to refill my handheld. I did, though, see the maestro of irunfar.com , Bryon Powell and yelled a friendly hello to him out of race excitement. If you aren’t already familiar, and you are into ultra running, then his website is a great resource. And I’m of no affiliation, btw, just a fan.

Morning alpenglow on Lone Peak while running impeccable singletrack around Moonlight Basin

Morning alpenglow on Lone Peak while running impeccable singletrack around Moonlight Basin

Gradual climbing but mainly runnable singletrack persisted out of the 7.5 aid until the 12.1 mile Elkhorn water station. I stopped here to down a small cup and to top off my bottle. In hindsight I should have tanked up further here, as I only had a single 20oz handheld with me. The next six miles to the Tram Dock 18 mile aid is fairly demanding and involves the first major 1400′ climb to Headwaters ridge (c. 10,100′) before quickly descending 1800′ and then climbing 1300′ to the aid. Not too shabby given that the main 2K’+ climb up Bonecrusher to the summit of Lone Peak (11,166′) was still ahead. While Headwaters is amazing and technical, another notable section coming off of the ridge was a short downhill length of maybe 20′ of near vertical dirt with even slicker surrounding grass alternatives. Nearly everyone that I witnessed was on their ass and crab-walking on all fours trying their best not to tumble down the slope! One of many memorable Rut moments.

Fixed down rope on the Headwaters ridge

Fixed down rope on the Headwaters ridge

The only out-and-back section of the course was a 1.5 mile stretch that centers on the Tram Dock 18 aid. It is entirely in the sun until the aid, where refreshments and friendly volunteers waited patiently. I had no drop bag and had carried all of my gear so I spent little time here before retracing my steps to the inevitable Lone Peak summit climb. This starts at around mile 18.7 and climbs over 2100′ in under 1.5 miles with 1000′ in the last 1/2 mile. Some steep ridgeline scrambling, for sure. A highlight along this section was not just the view, but also a 3-piece bluegrass band jamming out part-way up the ridge (!). Both of the ridgeline routes were something truly to take in and ones that I’ll surely recall for some time. Nice one, Montana Mikes.

Up high on the Bonecrusher ridge looking back. Somewhat steep.

Up high on the Bonecrusher ridge looking back. Somewhat steep.

At just over 20 miles and the summit of Lone Peak, was another aid station that I hung out at for a couple of minutes while discarding trash, eating a 1/4 banana, drinking some coke, refilling my water bottle, and snagging a gel. The amazing volunteers there wouldn’t even let me pick up a piece of dropped trash as they swooped in to take care of it while asking me what else they could get for me. I can’t even properly express my gratitude for all of the great volunteers but I do appreciate each and everyone. A big cheers to the folks who lent a helping hand.

Dinner plates coming off of the Lone Peak summit

Dinner plates coming off of the Lone Peak summit

Down from summit was pleasant, but in-the-moment dinner plate talus running with some friendly company for about 1/2 mile, then steeper, looser, and smaller scree by myself for another mile or so before hitting some more runnable single and doubletrack. This undulating trail weaved in and out of the woods, occasionally hitting a fire road but soon getting back to singletrack. There were even spectators at random spots with the ubiquitous The Rut cowbell to provide a surprise and needed boost. This largely downhill section is deceptive, luring the unsuspecting runner into thinking that it is all buttery, downhill singletrack from here on out. NOT so.

One of multiple ropes to aid on the up to Andesite. The photo does not do the reality justice.

One of multiple ropes to aid on the up to Andesite. The photo does not do the reality justice.

At mile 25.5 there is a very steep (or as the race literature states, ‘STEEP’) ~1000′ climb up to Andesite Mountain. It is rough in that much of the ascent is up a downhill mountain bike course that includes multiple fixed ropes (?!) to aid runners up the very steep, gullied track that is not really intended for uphill travel. While fairly difficult, I still grinned at the fact that I had to use the ropes to gain upward progress in the slick gullies. Sick, but kinda fun. After this grind, there is a final little slog on a service road to the top of Andesite and the final aid station. Here, I smiled at the thought of a mainly downhill final five miles, refilled my bottle one last time, swigged a shot of coke, thanked the volunteers, and passed a few runners with my over-exuberance on the way out of the aid. From here on out, I ran the nice singletrack by myself to the finish in 8:13:23. It was well off what I had hoped for but I was extremely happy with the overall race and how I felt throughout.

Lone Peak from Andesite. Looking back on the course and the two main ridges taken. Minor suffering was largely alleviated with views like this.

Lone Peak from Andesite. Looking back on the course and the two main ridges taken. Minor suffering was largely alleviated with views like this.

Gear thoughts:
(I used and very much appreciated all listed below)

Gear worn and carried: UD AK Race Vest, Salomon Sense Pro shoes, Drymax socks, Dynafit shorts, Rab Aeon tee, Mountain Hardwear arm sleeves, Montbell Tachyon windshirt, OR synthetic gloves, UV 1/2 BUFF, MH brimmed cap, BD Spot headlamp, cheapo shades, Sony waterproof P&S. It was fairly cold and I had on arm sleeves, buff, and gloves for over half of the race. The windshirt was arguably not needed but still was worn on the final ridgeline to Lone Peak for about an hour. I probably would have moved a bit faster here had I not had it! The AK Race Vest was a winner, as it has been for me and many others for some time now. This, and the SJ Ultra Vest were the most seen vests during the race. Salomon and Ultra Spire took a close second/third with a few others like Mountain Hardwear, Nathan, and Osprey in the mix. While the majority of runners used a vest pack, some folks went a handheld only, or coupled with a minimal belt and/or in-short storage.

Two of many UD Vests on the course. And some snow. This was descending  Headwaters ridge.

Two of many UD Vests on the course. And some snow. This was descending Headwaters ridge.

Fueling/hydration: GU, GU Roctane, Hammer gel, Bolt Chews, electrolyte tabs, a handful of potato chips, a few shots of coke, plenty of clear water. About one gel per hour, sometimes more. Electrolyte tabs with slightly less frequency. Bolt Chews intermittently throughout the race between gels. Crisps at Tram Dock aid. Coke shots at Tram Dock, Lone Peak, and Andesite aid stations. Everything worked well except my oversight for water need from mile 12-18 and from 20-26.5. My 20oz did not quite cut it and I could’ve used multiple more ounces for both of these stretches. I managed, though, and generally had a smooth time with fueling and hydration.

Out and back section to Tram Dock. Very lunar-like. Picture from low on Bonecrusher ridge.

Out and back section to Tram Dock. Very lunar-like. Picture from low on Bonecrusher ridge.

Summary:

Technical mountain running, cruiser singletrack, an 11K’+ summit, a deep field of world-class athletes, amazing volunteers, a lot of psyched runners, even more equally psyched fans, and vistas for days. The course was wonderful, and the folks were even better. Much love, Montana. Please do keep ’em coming.

The Rut 50K finish line and an elated me. (photo: J)

The Rut 50K finish line and an elated me. (photo: J)

The Teton Crest Trail in a day

AM traffic jam on the trail

AM traffic jam on the trail

One of my favorite places in the lower 48 has yet again, lived up to its hype. Glenn Owings and myself recently both jogged the Teton Crest Trail from Phillips TH to String Lake TH. Although finishing at String Lake, we cut off the last pass (Paintbrush Divide) due to time limitations. So instead of ~39 miles, we did ~33 point-to-point. Regardless of the deviation, it was a beautiful trail and a wonderful day in the mountains with a friend. That’s what’s up.

Warming sun and wildflowers. Glenn early on the TCT

Warming sun and wildflowers. Glenn early on the TCT

We both carried and wore similar gear for the day, with the standouts being the Ultimate Direction SJ Ultra Vest 2.0 and the Sawyer Water Filter Bottle. First up, the UD SJ Ultra Vest. Now in it’s second iteration, the SJ UV has just enough volume (7L) and compressibility for a full day in the hills. The SJ UV also has front bottle carry, ala the rest of their signature series of running vest-style packs, which allows for a well-balanced and efficient method of water carry. And as in this case, bear spray can go up front in a bottle pocket when running in grizzly country. The vest has very little bounce when loaded and fit properly, which is a key component to this style of carry. I also carried a pair of Ultra Distance Z-poles collapsed on the back of the pack for over a dozen miles and didn’t notice them there. Both Glenn and myself used the SJ UV to great success and would definitely use it again for similar long-day outings.

Ultimate Direction SJ Ultra Vest 2.0 and the Tetons

Ultimate Direction SJ Ultra Vest 2.0 and the Tetons

Next up, but no less successful is the Sawyer 24oz Water Filter Bottle. I’ve mentioned this dip/sip method before but the latest version incorporates Sawyer’s Mini Filter into the equation, thus lightening and lowering the volume of the system. The only modification that I’d suggest is doing away with the stock Sawyer bottle due to it’s stouter profile and hard plastic, and replacing it with a cheapo bike bottle of your preference. Most that I’ve found have a universal thread that mates up with the Sawyer lid. This way, the end result is trimmer for front vest carry and also facilitates being able to squeeze the bottle for increased flow. Glenn and I used this system to great success for the entire length of our Teton Crest experience. I’ve been using it for over a year now and find it to be a very time-effective solution to water filtration in the backcountry. Dipping and sipping, we carried no extraneous water weight the whole way.

Glenn demonstrating the 'dipping' half of the process

Glenn demonstrating the ‘dipping’ half of the process

So, those two pieces were the winners used for this trip. Everything else was fairly standard and trusty, with a windshirt, small emergency/FAK, LW gloves, buff, headlamp, and extra calories being carried inside the vest back. All other stuff, such as camera, gels, chews, electrolyte tabs, water, mini-map, and bear spray were carried somewhere in the external front and lat pockets. The system works pretty damn nicely.

Myself and AK Basin behind me (photo: Glenn)

Myself and AK Basin behind me (photo: Glenn)

The route went something like this: Headlamps, running, and the rising sun. Wildflowers and surrounding mountains begin to show themselves. Wildlife as well. Six moose in the course of a mile. Deer on the trail. Ten miles and Marion Lake, the day has just begun. Shelves of flowers and the first glimpse of the Tetons. Death Canyon Shelf was awfully nice. Granite, Whitebark, and elephant’s head in AK Basin. The best flowers of the trip out of said basin. Cheeky marmot and the three Tetons from atop Hurricane Pass. Schoolhouse glacier and the best of moraines. Old growth Whitebark and Doug fir, huckleberries, tourists, Jenny Lake, tired feet, no shade, String Lake, and a celebratory soak in the outlet. Pica’s in town for the best burrito and margarita combo around. Campfire back at Gros Ventre with Julia, shooting stars and the milky way to accompany. A sound night’s sleep.

Phillips Pass and one of many moose

Phillips Pass and one of many moose

Right after Marion Lake with the first glimpse of the Tetons. Oh yeah, and the wildflowers weren't bad either

Right after Marion Lake with the first glimpse of the Tetons. Oh yeah, and the wildflowers weren’t bad either

Leaving AK Basin while treated to colors and vistas

Leaving AK Basin while treated to colors and vistas

Approaching Hurricane Pass

Approaching Hurricane Pass

Marmot and the Grand. Hurricane Pass

Marmot and the Grand. Hurricane Pass

The Grand, Middle, and South Tetons in all of their glory

The Grand, Middle, and South Tetons in all of their glory

We really couldn’t have asked for a better day in the mountains. I can say it was training for The Rut 50K, but it was really just a gorgeous day out in some pretty nice wilderness. Just how we like ’em.

Glenn at the outlet of String Lake some miles later

Glenn at the outlet of String Lake some miles later

The 2014 Old Gabe 50K

Old Gabe ridge singletrack adorned with Larkspur and Arrowleaf Balsamroot.

Old Gabe ridge singletrack adorned with Larkspur and Arrowleaf Balsamroot.


Ahh, summer. It comes and it goes around here. It’s been a while (recently married! and a house purchase!) but here are some late thoughts on my first official ultra. The Old Gabe did not go as I had expected but I still finished and learned quite a bit in the process. Held on the summer solstice with perfect weather, the OG50 provided participants a full-value run in the mountains. The week prior it was snowing up high and raining down low so a break for June 21 was very much appreciated. The course was a little wet in places, but a lot of it was dry and somewhat runnable. Some of it not so.

Running when I could (this and most of the photos are  courtesy of Julia)

Running when I could (this and most of the photos are courtesy of Julia)


Sypes Ridge

Sypes Ridge

The race was rough and I experienced cramping early on that I then fought for the next 20 miles of the race. Much of this was due to an early and fast ascent-descent-ascent. By the time I was cresting Middle Cottonwood’s Saddle Pass for the second time (mile 12), my quads ceased working as I had expected them to. This was awfully disconcerting and it took me a few minutes to get going again. I still somehow held on and managed a sub-8 hour finish despite the cramp troubles. I kept the pace as manageable as possible and stuck to a good regiment of GU, GU Roctane, Bolt Chews, electrolyte pills, and water. There was mud, blood, snow, sweat, abundant stream crossings, wildflowers, wildlife, amazing volunteers, and great company. Even a stout 7-year old Scott Creel 50K record was broken by a very fast, Jim Walmsley of Black Eagle, MT! (results here)

Around mile 20 or so on the Old Gabe

Around mile 20 or so on the Old Gabe


Regarding gear, I’ll tell you what worked out nicely. I’ve been happy with these for numerous training runs as well as for the race. I’ll also be using them for the upcoming Rut 50K. After sitting pretty deep on the wait list for months as penance for a late registration, I recently received an email notice with entry confirmation. I am very excited and appreciative to be able to compete in such a world-class event here in my backyard. The Rut (VK, 12K, 50K) is hosted by The North Face athletes and fellow Montanans, The Mikes (Mike Wolfe and Mike Foote). It is part of the Skyrunner World Series and will host a deep field of elite mountain runners from across the globe. It’s bound to be a blast! Anyway, here’s the gear highlights from an otherwise pretty difficult Old Gabe 50K:
Sypes Ridge. Jurek Essential helping me grind it out.

Sypes Ridge. Jurek Essential helping me grind it out.


Ultimate Direction is the standout. I’ve been using numerous products of theirs for a couple of years now and I’m rarely disappointed. The two winners this time around are the Jurek Essential and the Jurek Grip. Both are lessons in simplicity and are obviously well thought-out pieces. The Grip is a no-frills 15g, 20 fl oz handheld solution. The Essential is a 59g waist belt that has two fixed pockets (one stretch and one nylon) as well as a small, stretchy, removable valuables/electrolyte pocket. It is built on a 3/4″ belt and can be worn next-to-skin and over a shirt. I personally carry a small emergency/FAK, 2-4 extra gels, one packet of chews, and electrolyte pills in the Endure with room to spare. There is virtually no bounce and I barely notice it is there for dozens of miles on end. It had become a staple of my mountain running kit. Paired with the Jurek Grip, I have quite the duo to get through most ultras that have regular aid.
Jurek Grip (upper left) and Jurek Essential (below), with example of what the belt will easily hold

Jurek Grip (upper left) and Jurek Essential (below), with example of what the belt will easily hold


So that’s it for now. It’s three weeks until The Rut and it’ll be taper time soon. Summer is winding down here with rapidly dropping temps and days of rain. I’ve got more than I had bargained for this go round, so I’m looking forward to the changing of seasons and the upcoming snow. But until then, there’s some more mountain running to be had!
Bridger ridge running, early August '14

Bridger ridge running, early August ’14


Bridger ridge running, late August '14

Bridger ridge running, late August ’14

 

A Mt Blackmore spring ski

Morning stream crossing

Morning stream crossing


It may be June, but after such a banner year for snowpack here in SW Montana there is still plenty of skiing to be had. It was even snowing on me this weekend as I summited Mt Blackmore (10154’/3095m) with skis. I’ve been putting in a lot of trail running mileage lately and thought I’d break it up a bit with a quick tour of the pyramid that peeks over the Gallatin foothills.
Skinning towards Mt. Blackmore's east face

Skinning towards Mt. Blackmore’s east face

The north face and its springtime bunny ears are a siren call to glisse mountaineers here in town based on a mix of accessibility, appearance, and the mountain’s ski history. Names such as Tom Jungst, Doug Coombs, Hans Saari, and Alex Lowe are just a few that come to mind. Also, ski touring this winter has provided a great aerobic base as well as strong legs for an easier transition into spring ultra marathon training. So why not give thanks to mountain running by skiing the mountains – and visa versa?! I hope to get some summer skiing in but until then I’ll probably be running the trails these last few weeks in prep for the summer-opening Old Gabe 50k. Pretty psyched for it! Anyway, here’s my recent Blackmore trip in photos and some standout gear notes below:

First semi-continuous snow after Blackmore Lake

First semi-continuous snow after Blackmore Lake


Skinning with Elephant Mtn behind

Skinning with Elephant Mtn behind


Tracks

Tracks


Booting the east ridge in the rain

Booting the east ridge in the rain


Skiing from the summit in the snow!

Skiing from the summit in the snow!


Exit faffing...dirt skiing

Exit faffing…dirt skiing


Nearly back

Nearly back

Gear Highlights – all of the below has been with me for many miles and thousands of vert over the course of months to years. It was also all used on this trip to Blackmore. Buyer beware:

Sportiva GTR with Plum Race 145. Mounted 2cm forward. Awesome.
Dynafit TLT6 P. No tongue or powerstrap. The gold standard of LW touring boots.
BD Whippet. A little extra security goes a long ways. For the up & the down.
RAB Fusion pant. Hybrid of Neoshell and Matrix softshell. My go-to touring pant.
RAB Boreas Pull-On. 4-way stretch UL softshell/windshirt. Highly functional mid/outerlayer.
Patagonia Houdini. Simple nylon windshirt. One of my most used pieces over the last five years.
RAB VR Tour Glove. Super breathable two-ply softshell with a Pittards leather palm. So very nice.

Thanks as always for checking in and please do enjoy yourselves out there!

Gratuitous summit selfie

Gratuitous summit selfie